The Cuckoo’s Calling

23 Sep

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Not long ago there was a lot of media hype about the fact that The Cuckoo’s Calling was actually written by J.K. Rowling, not Robert Galbraith. She had attempted to leave behind the Harry Potter stigma in an attempt at a “fair shot” at writing some other genre, and to see if it/she was actually any good in her own right.

I’m here to tell you, after finishing this book, that she needs to stick with Harry Potter! Don’t get me wrong, I loved Harry Potter. And, no, I didn’t expect this to be anything like it. The Cuckoo’s Calling is an adult book (no, not that kind of adult book, just one written towards a grown-up audience; drugs, sex, and a little rock n’ roll), about a private investigator named Cormoran Strike and his temporary secretary Robin. Strike (as he is most often referred to) is hired to investigate the suicide/murder of a famous model named Lula Laundry, by Lula’s brother John.

This book took me FOREVER to finish, right about two months. It’s not an overly huge book, just over 450 pages. The problem is that none of the characters made me love them, hate them, or want to be them. They were so unbelievable and inhuman that you didn’t care for them one way or the other. I seriously only finished reading the book because I had actually paid for a hardback copy. And, if you know me you know I don’t like to waste money, so I finished the book.

The only redeeming quality is the last 100 or so pages. When you realized that Strike knows the real story and you as the reader still have no idea (or at least I had no idea, right up until the very end when it’s blatantly obvious). The ending really is good, not very good, but good.

Overall I’d give this book two and a half stars, maybe three if I just based it on the last few chapters. I’d NEVER bother to read it again. Too bad for me I also purchased The Casual Vacancy at the same time. I’ll read it because I bought it, but I have a really bad feeling I’m not going to like it. None-the-less I will start it with an open mind and hope to be proven wrong.

Have you read this book? What did you think? I’d love to hear your comments!

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